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Fat Loss for Athletes: The Right Way to Approach Calories and Hormones - BarBend

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5 Minuten, 59 Sekunden

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Fat loss

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BarBend ✓ Nutrition ✓ Short ✓ Effect ✓ Shamayeva ✓ Effects ✓ Calories ✓ Approach ✓ Right ✓ Endocrinol

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This may be an individual thing, so see how you feel -- just remember that a fanatical focus on fat loss can easily hinder strength. We'd love to tell you an exact body fat percentage that everyone should shoot for to have the best performance and aesthetics but like Shamayeva says, it's an individual thing. Besides pointing out that going very low in fat, like under 10 percent of your daily calories, could tamper with testosterone levels, figuring out the rest of your macros is up to you.

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Fat Loss for Athletes: The Right Way to Approach Calories and Hormones - BarBend
Bildquelle: https://img00.deviantart.net/7b39/i/2016/072/c/b/inflated_minnie_by_ww07kid-d9ux7f7.png    

but how quickly you can and should lose fat depends on your body fat levels: an obese person can lose fat a lot more quickly, easily, and with fewer side effects than someone who's already lean. people with very high body fat might want to think about a 7,000 calorie deficit per week, which would result in two pounds lost. Dr. Nadolsky points out that while you don't want to lose weight too fast, it's no fun to lose it too slowly, either. "When people go too slow in the beginning it can cause diet fatigue, which goes counterintuitive to what most people think," he says. "Most people think people go too fast, but if you have a lot of weight to lose, say you're in twenty to thirty percent body fat range, you can probably go a bit faster relative to a person who is a lot leaner, perhaps as high as one percent of your weight per week." Your own case will be individual and while we've said this already, definitely chat to a physician or dietitian to find out what the best strategy is for you. strong_suit and Fat Loss Here's a big thing that separates strength athletes and bodybuilders: a lot of the time , you're stronger and perform better if you're carrying a decent amount of body fat. We're not talking about obesity levels, here, but your adipose tissue does play an important role in maintaining hormonal health, energy levels, mood, and some aspects of performance. "I know that athletes are always trying to burn as much fat and retain as much muscle as possible during weight loss, but I think it's worth considering an approach that will leave some fat on your body," say Shamayeva. "Slicing your body fat down to single digits can hamper mood, sleep, and performance. This may be an individual thing, so see how you feel -- just remember that a fanatical focus on fat loss can easily hinder strength. Everyone should take a more balanced approach to body comp." We'd love to tell you an exact body fat percentage that everyone should shoot for to have the best performance and aesthetics but like Shamayeva says, it's an individual thing. Of course, we recognize that you probably have a weight class to think about, it's just worth remembering that many a strength athlete has focused intently on dropping body fat to meet a goal weight and found that their performance winds up worse than if they'd kept some fat on their frame for the ride. Of course, muscle is still tremendously important for strength and for most athletes, figuring out their individual body's best balance of muscle and fat is simply achieved through trial and error. Once they've been competing for a few years, many athletes wish they could tell their younger selves that extra muscle mass isn't always needed and sacrificing a little muscle for a little fat would have resulted in better performance, even if it's just because of the effect on sleep and hormones. Calories and Macronutrients for Fat Loss The science agrees that whether you're gaining or losing weight, athletes should aim for one point six to two point two grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight if they want to gain or retain as much muscle as they can, and yes, that means you can drop as low as zero point seven two grams per pound of weight.(1) "The more fat you have the less protein per bodyweight you're going to need, it's when you get leaner is when you need to be a bit more precise," adds Nadolsky. " sol if you have a lot of excess fat you can go lower on your protein per pound, but the leaner you are, the closer you should be to that zero point eight to one gram per pound goal." The harder task is figuring out how many calories to consume overall and what the rest of your macronutrients should look like. Your calories will depend on your height, weight, body fat levels, and activity levels, and even then the numbers that online calculators and even dietitians recommend are something of a crapshoot: it's a number to start with, then experiment with until you get the best idea for what works for your weight loss goals. "People tend to focus on what the can't eat when on a weight loss plan, rather than what they can eat," says Rizzo. "Although you're probably minimizing your intake of fatty foods, snacks, and sweets, you can usually eat as many vegetables as you want, as well as lean protein and fruit. You don't need to starve yourself and stop eating entirely. Instead, build a healthy plate with tons of fruits and veggies, then add your protein and carbs as needed. " "Patience is key when it comes to body comp," says Shamayeva. "It's often a math game, but remember that calorie burn and intake are estimates. Don't get discouraged if you need to experiment a bit with intake and exercise. Online calculators are a cheap, reasonable option for a calorie burn estimate. The next step up, without getting or paying for any tests, is a personal fitness tracker. We know that "it's all individual" is more frustrating to read than an article that tells you the precise calories and macros you require, but an article that does that isn't doing you any favors. Our bodies vary a lot. A calorie goal is easier to land on than a macronutrient goal, though. Unless you're pretty lean, once you've figured out how many calories you burn a day you can comfortably aim for a deficit of 3,500 calories per week to result in a pound of weight loss. (We know that even this is controversial but we're trying to be helpful, here. It's accepted widely enough that it's not a bad place to start.) This brings up the eternal question of whether low carb or low fat is best for weight loss, but especially when it comes to athletes -- who have to maintain a certain amount of activity, so a weight loss diet that leaves them feeling (and performing) like trash isn't that useful -- it comes down to what feels better.(2) Some people feel fantastic without all those carbs spiking their insulin, others feel great with all that sustained energy. filling up your macros with fat at the expense of necessarily reducing carbs can make some folks feel sluggish. For others, it just works. Besides pointing out that going very low in fat, like under 10 percent of your daily calories, could tamper with testosterone levels, figuring out the rest of your macros is up to you.(3)(4)(5) It's true that broadly speaking, programs usually recommend going higher in carbs for weight gain and lower in carbs for weight loss, but so long as your calories are in check, it's best to eat in a way that makes you able to work out as hard as you can. For most people that means eating more food and carbs on days they work out than on rest days -- this is one nifty trick that helps you work out harder and your muscles recover better. "

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    But how quickly you can and should lose fat depends on your body fat levels: an obese person can lose fat a lot more quickly, easily, and with fewer side effects than someone who's already lean. People with very high body fat might want to think about a 7,000 calorie deficit per week, which would result in two pounds lost. Dr. Nadolsky points out that while you don't want to lose weight too fast, it's no fun to lose it too slowly, either. "When people go too slow in the beginning it can cause diet fatigue, which goes counterintuitive to what most people think," he says. "Most people think people go too fast, but if you have a lot of weight to lose, say you're in 20 to 30 percent body fat range, you can probably go a bit faster relative to a person who is a lot leaner, perhaps as high as 1 percent of your weight per week." Your own case will be individual and while we've said this already, definitely chat to a physician or dietitian to find out what the best strategy is for you. Strength and Fat Loss Here's a big thing that separates strength athletes and bodybuilders: a lot of the time, you're stronger and perform better if you're carrying a decent amount of body fat. We're not talking about obesity levels, here, but your adipose tissue does play an important role in maintaining hormonal health, energy levels, mood, and some aspects of performance. "I know that athletes are always trying to burn as much fat and retain as much muscle as possible during weight loss, but I think it's worth considering an approach that will leave some fat on your body," say Shamayeva. "Slicing your body fat down to single digits can hamper mood, sleep, and performance. This may be an individual thing, so see how you feel -- just remember that a fanatical focus on fat loss can easily hinder strength. Everyone should take a more balanced approach to body comp." We'd love to tell you an exact body fat percentage that everyone should shoot for to have the best performance and aesthetics but like Shamayeva says, it's an individual thing. Of course, we recognize that you probably have a weight class to think about, it's just worth remembering that many a strength athlete has focused intently on dropping body fat to meet a goal weight and found that their performance winds up worse than if they'd kept some fat on their frame for the ride. Of course, muscle is still tremendously important for strength and for most athletes, figuring out their individual body's best balance of muscle and fat is simply achieved through trial and error. Once they've been competing for a few years, many athletes wish they could tell their younger selves that extra muscle mass isn't always needed and sacrificing a little muscle for a little fat would have resulted in better performance, even if it's just because of the effect on sleep and hormones. Calories and Macronutrients for Fat Loss The science agrees that whether you're gaining or losing weight, athletes should aim for 1.6 to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight if they want to gain or retain as much muscle as they can, and yes, that means you can drop as low as 0.72 grams per pound of weight.(1) "The more fat you have the less protein per bodyweight you're going to need, it's when you get leaner is when you need to be a bit more precise," adds Nadolsky. " So if you have a lot of excess fat you can go lower on your protein per pound, but the leaner you are, the closer you should be to that 0.8 to 1 gram per pound goal." The harder task is figuring out how many calories to consume overall and what the rest of your macronutrients should look like. Your calories will depend on your height, weight, body fat levels, and activity levels, and even then the numbers that online calculators and even dietitians recommend are something of a crapshoot: it's a number to start with, then experiment with until you get the best idea for what works for your weight loss goals. "People tend to focus on what the can't eat when on a weight loss plan, rather than what they can eat," says Rizzo. "Although you're probably minimizing your intake of fatty foods, snacks, and sweets, you can usually eat as many vegetables as you want, as well as lean protein and fruit. You don't need to starve yourself and stop eating entirely. Instead, build a healthy plate with tons of fruits and veggies, then add your protein and carbs as needed. " "Patience is key when it comes to body comp," says Shamayeva. "It's often a math game, but remember that calorie burn and intake are estimates. Don't get discouraged if you need to experiment a bit with intake and exercise. Online calculators are a cheap, reasonable option for a calorie burn estimate. The next step up, without getting or paying for any tests, is a personal fitness tracker. We know that "it's all individual" is more frustrating to read than an article that tells you the precise calories and macros you require, but an article that does that isn't doing you any favors. Our bodies vary a lot. A calorie goal is easier to land on than a macronutrient goal, though. Unless you're pretty lean, once you've figured out how many calories you burn a day you can comfortably aim for a deficit of 3,500 calories per week to result in a pound of weight loss. (We know that even this is controversial but we're trying to be helpful, here. It's accepted widely enough that it's not a bad place to start.) This brings up the eternal question of whether low carb or low fat is best for weight loss, but especially when it comes to athletes -- who have to maintain a certain amount of activity, so a weight loss diet that leaves them feeling (and performing) like trash isn't that useful -- it comes down to what feels better.(2) Some people feel fantastic without all those carbs spiking their insulin, others feel great with all that sustained energy. Filling up your macros with fat at the expense of necessarily reducing carbs can make some folks feel sluggish. For others, it just works. Besides pointing out that going very low in fat, like under 10 percent of your daily calories, could tamper with testosterone levels, figuring out the rest of your macros is up to you.(3)(4)(5) It's true that broadly speaking, programs usually recommend going higher in carbs for weight gain and lower in carbs for weight loss, but so long as your calories are in check, it's best to eat in a way that makes you able to work out as hard as you can. For most people that means eating more food and carbs on days they work out than on rest days -- this is one nifty trick that helps you work out harder and your muscles recover better. "



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