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Complete List of Graduate Courses

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Deinstitutionalization

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  • The course will focus on emerging issues such as coverage of sexual orientation and gender identity, big data and disparate impact, the intersection between criminal justice and employment opportunity, arbitration and privatization of adjudication, the new gig economy, migration and human trafficking, and religious pluralism.
  • Specific topics include constitutional amendment, limitations on judicial independence, control over the media, takings and other restrictions of the free market, voter suppression and gerrymandering, plebiscites (e.g., Brexit), and threats to fundamental rights.
  • Part II, AIDS in the Courtroom, covers the major court cases related to HIV/AIDS in the United States and in key countries around the world like South Africa, India and Brazil that provide important comparative perspectives to understand the power of law.

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LAW two thousand and fifty-eight v00 Academic Legal English I LL.M Seminar | 6 credit hours Academic Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This year-long course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the U.S. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, law review articles, and court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, issue spotter exam answers, and academic papers). Throughout the academic year, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development. Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW two thousand and ninety-two v00 Academic Legal English II LL.M Seminar | 6 credit hours Academic Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This year-long course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the U.S. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, law review articles, and court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, issue spotter exam answers, and academic papers). Throughout the academic year, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development. Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW three thousand and eighty-eight v00 Academic Legal English: malefactor Procedure LL.M Seminar | three credit hours Academic Legal English: Criminal Procedure is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the U.S. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding judicial opinions, as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, course outlines, issue spotter exam answers). Throughout the semester, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development. Legal cases in criminal procedure law provide the primary content for skills development. Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW three thousand and eighty-nine v00 Academic Legal English: Grammar in Legal Contexts II LL.M Seminar | two credit hours Academic Legal English: Grammar in Legal Contexts II is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This course is designed with a particular emphasis on developing language skills for understanding and producing academic legal texts through improving your grammatical knowledge and accuracy. in the Spring semester, this course will focus on writing strategies (e.g., organizational strategies, stylistic choices, and accurate production of complex grammatical structures) that are characteristic of legal texts (e.g., “take-home ” and “in-class” exam writing) students likely need to produce in law school. Legal cases in criminal procedure law, law review articles, and other secondary sources provide the primary content for skills development. Throughout the semester, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their language development. Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW three thousand and eighty v00 Academic Legal English: Oral Communication Skills II LL.M Seminar | two credit hours Academic Legal English: Oral Communication Skills II is required for students in the Two-year LL.M. Program. This spring semester course will focus on speaking and listening skills necessary to succeed in the legal professional environment in the United States. Throughout the semester, students will Complete four major speaking assignments that cover a range of professional skills, such as conducting a presentation via video conferencing technology, presenting information to a supervisor, questioning a witness in a trial, and giving an oral argument. Students will also have the opportunity to visit the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and the Supreme Court of the United States. Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW five hundred and thirty-four v01 Access to decay Care and Coverage: Law and Policy J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours The law governing access to health care has been in flux and in legal dispute in recent years. This course will examine Americas programs for health care access and finance, including employment-based private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, and VA. The course will also examine the enactment, implementation, and litigation of the Affordable Care Act. In addition to these payment systems, the course will also at laws affecting non-comprehensive systems such as emergency rooms, public hospitals, and community health centers. No previous knowledge of health law is required. Note: The course will not focus on biomedical ethics, medical malpractice, or pharmaceutical regulation. This is a required course for the U.S. Health Law Certificate. LAW three thousand and ninety-one v00 Addiction and Mental Health Law and Policy LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours Addiction and mental health have increasingly become an integral part of the broader policy landscape. This shift has been accelerated by the impact of social issues such as the opioid epidemic, suicide and homelessness. This seminar will explore the framework of laws and policies promoting human rights, dignity, and recovery for people with substance use disorders and mental health conditions. It will highlight systemic and community responses to addiction, mental health, and related social issues as well as the use of litigation, legislation, advocacy and financial incentives as tools for reform. Discussion will include: Evolution of responses to addiction, mental health, and related social issues; Human rights, deinstitutionalization and the rights of an individual to receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs; Statutory and regulatory frameworks promoting access to treatment, including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Understanding data, outcome measures, and healthcare finance structures for behavioral health, including Medicaid and commercial insurance; The role of litigation to promote accountability and protect civil rights; The impact of stigma, the dignity of risk, and harm reduction philosophy; Role of the health care and criminal justice systems and trends in reforms; The impact of globalization and comparative analysis of international drug policy; Cultural competence in legal advocacy and practice. Guest lectures and discussion will provide real world case studies on laws and policy reforms impacting addiction and mental health. LAW twenty-five v00 Administrative Law J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This course considers the constitutional, statutory, and other legal limitations on what government agencies can do and how they can do it . What constraints govern the power of agencies to make law, decide cases involving private parties, and investigate citizens? How much due process must government agencies give citizens whose lives they affect; what limits has Congress imposed on the procedures for agency decision making; and to what extent can people call on courts to check what they regard as abuses of governmental power? These are among the questions addressed in the course, which draws together problems ranging from the legitimacy of New Deal institutions to the dramatic procedural innovations of recent federal administrations and problems created by renewed Congressional interest in the details of agency decision making. Recommended: For Professor Nagers section: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Constitutional Law I: The Federal System. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first-year elective by the same name or the first-year course, Government Processes. LAW one thousand, three hundred and forty-nine v00 Administrative Law J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours There is no more fundamental course in law school than administrative law. This course introduces you to the modern administrative and regulatory state. You will come to understand both the tremendous power exercised by administrative agencies and the significant constraints (legal and political) under which they operate. You will learn to identify the design features that might make an agency constitutionally problematic, the factors that make one type of decision-making framework more appropriate than another, the prerogatives and limits of agencies in interpreting the statutes they are charged with administering, and agencies ’ prerogatives and limits in adjudicating facts and exercising policymaking discretion. You will also learn to identify the factors that affect the availability and timing of judicial review of agency action. Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first-year elective by the same name or the first year electives, The Regulatory State or Legislation and Regulation, or Government Processes, or Legislation and Regulations: Law, Science, and Policy. LAW four hundred and forty-eight v00 Advanced Antitrust Economics and Law Seminar J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This seminar examines recent developments in the economic approach to antitrust law and practice. Topics include issues at the frontier in various areas, including some or all of the following: decision-theoretic approach to antitrust, partial ownership acquisitions, advanced merger analysis and policy, buyer power, conditional pricing practices, intellectual property/antitrust interface, pay-for-delay agreements, standard setting, abuse of dominance, and behavioral economics. Students must Complete a two or three credit paper and weekly assignments on the topic for the week. Some time is spent throughout the term on the student papers. This is an excellent course for students preparing for a career on antitrust. There will be written assignments that must be submitted for each class. Attendance is also required. Prerequisite: Antitrust Law (or the equivalent Antitrust Economics and Law). Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the three credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. LAW one thousand, five hundred and twenty-eight v00 Advanced Antitrust Seminar: Antitrust and Intellectual Property J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours The intersection of antitrust and intellectual property underlies many key debates in contemporary competition law and presents topics of recurring importance. This advanced seminar introduces students to the antitrust/intellectual property interface, including the economics of innovation, the debate over the relationship between the two fields, and the impact of the evolution of that relationship on the antitrust analysis of specific practices. Topics include the economics of innovation, the contemporary debate over “ Big Tech,” licensing practices, product design and tying, patent settlements, patent pools, standard setting, the acquisition of intellectual property rights, patent assertion entities, the assertion of IP rights, and antitrust counterclaims in U.S. litigation. Grades will be based on weekly papers written in response to the assigned readings; class participation can increase, but not decrease, the course grade. Learning Objectives: Students taking this course will: Develop an understanding of the basic economics of innovation and their application of those principles to antitrust law and its intersection with intellectual property law. Acquire an overview of key aspects of the intersection of antitrust and intellectual property in U.S. law, both in litigation and agency settings. Explore recurring tensions between antitrust and intellectual property through the lens of particular practices. Debate competing positions on the antitrust laws’ application to cutting-edge issues in IP-rich industries. Prerequisite: For J.D. students, prior or concurrent enrollment in Antitrust Law or Antitrust Economics and Law. (Note that prior enrollment strongly recommended; concurrent enrollment accepted) . For LL.M students: prior U.S. antitrust litigation experience or U.S. antitrust coursework is strongly recommended. Note: A limited number of students may register for the three credit section of this seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. Students who register for the 3 credit section will write fewer weekly response papers, in addition to the paper for the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. LAW one thousand, four hundred and seventy-four v00 Advanced Civil Rights: The Civil Rights Act of 1964, The Frontiers of Civil Rights Enforcement and the Next Fifty Years J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours The Civil Rights Act of 1964, growing out of a sweeping grassroots civil roots movement was one of most important pieces of legislation passed in American history. At the time of passage, it was called a Magna Carta of Human Rights and during its first fifty years it produced enormous changes in legal doctrine, the workplace, and society. These changes in the legal landscape include disparate impact doctrine aimed at systemic racial discrimination, hostile work environment, religious accommodation, and gender stereotyping. This seminar will examine, from a practitioners perspective, how social change, evolving ideas of race and gender, globalization, global conflict, and technology will shape the development of this Act (and notions of equality) over the next fifty-years and the legal strategies to navigate this terrain. The course will focus on emerging issues such as coverage of sexual orientation and gender identity, big data and disparate impact, the intersection between criminal justice and employment opportunity, arbitration and privatization of adjudication, the new gig economy, migration and human trafficking, and religious pluralism. Strongly Recommended: Constitutional Law I and Employment Discrimination. LAW one thousand, seven hundred and sixteen v00 Advanced Constitutional Law Seminar: Challenges to Liberal Democracies J.D. Seminar | three credit hours This seminar examines the challenges to constitutional democracies from illiberalism, i.e. the concentration of power that relies on elections, limits judicial independence, and abuses the rule of law in the name of the people. Many so-called democracies have serious flaws in their election systems, limited judicial independence, and elected leaders who are not held in check by functioning rule of law processes/checks and balances. In the United States, efforts have been made to change rules for voting, draw electoral districts to give extreme partisan advantage, and use federal government agencies as weapons to thwart checks and balances. In this seminar we apply a multidisciplinary approach to the American situation, putting legal (in particular constitutional) transformation in the center. Specific topics include constitutional amendment, limitations on judicial independence, control over the media, takings and other restrictions of the free market, voter suppression and gerrymandering, plebiscites (e.g., Brexit), and threats to fundamental rights. In addition to considering Turkey and the countries of East Central Europe, where voters have chosen autocratic leaders, we will also examine the Russian approach which has served as a model for many emerging illiberal regimes as well as a financial and intellectual support for illiberal movements from France to Italy and elsewhere, to better understand developments in the U.S. In addition, the course will consider how crises, such as public health issues or civil unrest, are used as justification for limiting true democracy. In addition to examining the legal structures that permit this abuse of the democratic form, this course will also address the critical question of whether a democracy is sustainable in the face of ethno- or religious populism. Are there sources of constitutional resilience to save the remaining constitutional regimes? bar one thousand, three hundred and eighty-seven v00 Advanced Constitutional Law Seminar: The Constitution, Democracy, and the Economy in the 21st Century J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This two-credit seminar will explore the many constitutional questions raised by the effort to maintain a democracy in the 21st century. We will examine in detail current questions in the law of democracy (particularly free speech and the regulation of campaign finance) as well as the growing conflict between the Constitution and the regulation of economic life. We will explore what is distinctive about the intersection of contemporary constitutional law, the economy, and efforts to maintain democracy today, including by contrast to the history of the protection of economic liberties. The course materials will focus throughout on notions of freedom, individual and collective choice, and democratic practice. The readings will include the principal extreme Court cases, such as Buckley v. Valeo, Citizens United v. FEC, McCutcheon v. FEC, Virginia State Board of Pharmacy v. Virginia Citizens Consumer Council, and Sorrell v. IMS Health, as well as leading scholarship in the field, including : Robert Post, Citizens Divided Larry Lessig, Republic 2.0 Jane Mayer, Dark Money Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson, Winner-Take-All Politics David Singh Grewal, The Laws of Capitalism Bruce Ackerman, Beyond Carolene Products Suzanna Sherry, Property is the New Privacy: The Coming Constitutional Revolution Prerequisite: Constitutional Law II: Individual Rights and Liberties. LAW one thousand, three hundred and eighty-seven v01 Advanced Constitutional Law: The Constitution, Democracy, and the Economy J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course will explore the relationship between constitutional rights, the economy, and efforts to maintain a democracy today. We will examine the emergence and transformation of the notion of “civil liberties” as a concept in American legal culture, including by reference to the history of the protection of economic liberties. We will explore in detail some of the most prominent current controversies in constitutional law, including questions in the law of democracy (particularly free speech and the regulation of campaign finance) and the growing conflict between the Constitution and the regulation of economic life. The readings will include principal Supreme Court cases and leading scholarship in the field. The materials will focus throughout on notions of freedom and liberty, individual and collective choice, and democratic practice. The course will additionally include discussion of constitutional and appellate advocacy and the relationship between the academic works we read and current and seminal cases. Leading practitioners and scholars may join us for certain classes. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law II: Individual Rights and Liberties. LAW one thousand, six hundred and forty-eight v00 Advanced Corporate Finance: Quantitative Analysis and Valuation J.D. Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours This two-credit course provides an introduction to basic quantitative analysis techniques in corporate finance. Students will learn the fundamentals of valuation as it relates to a variety of assets, including bonds, stocks, options, and derivatives. Our class discussion will also touch on real problems that students are likely to face in legal practice. Topics covered include: analysis of basic financial statements; net present value and internal rate of return; dividend discount model; bond pricing, yields and the term structure of interest rates; the capital asset pricing model (CAPM); weighted average cost of capital; arbitrage pricing theory; free cash flow analysis; efficient and alternative theories of capital markets; capital structure and leverage; dividend and payout policy; put and call option pricing; the Black-Scholes model; warrants and convertibles; and the pricing of forward and futures contracts. If time permits, we will also touch on more advanced pricing techniques that use stochastic processes such as random walks. We will also briefly discuss how banking works, as well as more recent financial innovations, such as the creation of asset-backed securities. In particular, we will discuss the role securitization played both in improving access to credit and in creating macroeconomic instability, most notably during the Financial Crisis of two thousand and eight and the ensuing Great Recession. In addition to teaching students tangible skills, the course will develop their mathematical intuition, which will enable them to navigate financial problems with more confidence in both in their professional and personal lives. This mathematical intuition will be built up through 4-6 problem sets I will assign. These problem sets will also enable students to gain familiarity with Microsoft Excel, which we will use at various points during the semester. Our textbook will be Corporate Finance (11th ed. 2016) by Ross, Westerfield, Jaffe, and Jordan. Class attendance is mandatory and along with participation will count for 10% of the final grade. Problem sets will count for 20% of the final grade, with the remaining 70% determined by a comprehensive four-hour final exam. While not strictly required, students enrolled in the course should be comfortable with basic algebra for the problem sets. Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations or Corporate Finance or Business Basics for Lawyers or Business Essentials: A Mini-MBA for Lawyers or Accounting for Lawyers. LAW twenty-nine v00 Advanced Environmental Law: Climate Change (Project-Based Practicum) J.D. Practicum (cross-listed) | four credit hours In a project-based practicum course, students participate in a weekly seminar and work on a project under the supervision of their professor. This project-based practicum course will focus on the evolving legal and policy developments concerning global climate change, and provide students the opportunity to engage in hands-on work with policymakers in addressing the issue. Students will participate in a two hour/week seminar and carry out ten hours/week of project work including regularly scheduled meetings with professor and Georgetown Climate Center attorney advisors. SEMINAR: This seminar covers the current understanding of climate change science and impacts, international and domestic policy approaches, technological and adaptation responses, and legal and regulatory cases and developments. Class participation and attendance will be graded. PROJECT WORK: Students will prepare papers and make presentations in class and to outside “clients” on topics being analyzed for state and local governments through the work of the Georgetown Climate Center of Georgetown Law. Students work with professor and advisors to develop professional-quality work products that can be shared with outside clients. The Center works with states and communities on crafting policy strategies to reduce emissions that contribute to climate change and to adapt to the consequences of climate change. Prerequisite: Environmental Law. J.D. students must Complete the required first-year program prior to enrolling in this course (part-time and interdivisional transfer students may enroll prior to completing offender Justice, Property, or their first-year elective). Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not take another practicum course or a clinic at the same time as a project-based practicum course. Students may enroll in an externship at the same time as a project-based practicum course. Note: This course may be suitable for evening students who can regularly attend class and participate in calls or meetings during the day as students interact with professors, advisors, and/or clients . This is a four credit course. Two credits will be awarded for the two-hour weekly seminar and two credits for approximately ten hours of project work per week, for a minimum of eleven weeks. Both the seminar portion and the project work will be graded. This is a four credit course. Two credits will be awarded for the two-hour weekly seminar and two credits for approximately ten hours of project work per week, for a minimum of eleven weeks. Both the seminar portion and the project work will be graded. Students who enroll in this course will be automatically enrolled in both the seminar and project components and may not take either component separately. After Add/Drop, a student who wishes to withdraw from a practicum course must obtain permission from the faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Experiential Education. The Assistant Dean will grant such withdrawal requests only when remaining enrolled in the practicum would cause significant hardship for the student. A student who is granted permission to withdraw will be withdrawn from both the seminar and project components. Students who enroll in this course will be automatically enrolled in both the seminar and project components and may not take either component separately. After Add/Drop, a student who wishes to withdraw from a practicum course must obtain permission from the faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Experiential Education. The Assistant Dean will grant such withdrawal requests only when remaining enrolled in the practicum would cause significant hardship for the student. A student who is granted permission to withdraw will be withdrawn from both the seminar and project components. Regular and punctual attendance is required at all practicum seminars and students are required to devote the requisite number of hours to their project. If a student must miss seminar, project work, a meeting or a deliverable, he or she must speak to the professor as soon as possible (ideally beforehand) to discuss the absence or missed assignment. Unless the professor indicates otherwise, a student with more than one unexcused absence from the practicum seminar (out of thirteen total seminar sessions), or one week of unexcused absences from the fieldwork or project work (out of a total of eleven weeks of fieldwork or project work), may receive a lower grade or, at the professor’s discretion, may be withdrawn from the practicum course. Regular and punctual attendance is required at all practicum seminars and students are required to devote the requisite number of hours to their project. If a student must miss seminar, project work, a meeting or a deliverable, he or she must speak to the professor as soon as possible (ideally beforehand) to discuss the absence or missed assignment. Unless the professor indicates otherwise, a student with more than one unexcused absence from the practicum seminar (out of 13 total seminar sessions), or one week of unexcused absences from the fieldwork or project work (out of a total of 11 weeks of fieldwork or project work), may receive a lower grade or, at the professor’s discretion, may be withdrawn from the practicum course. bar one thousand, seven hundred and twelve v00 Advanced proof J.D. Course | three credit hours This course will take an in-depth look at issues involving the law of evidence. The topics discussed will likely fall into three categories. This first category concerns constitutional limitations on evidence rules such as the Confrontation Clause, a criminal defendant’s constitutional right to present a defense, and the impeachment of jury verdicts. The second category concerns advanced problems involving character, hearsay, experts, and privileges. The third category concerns the process of proof in civil and criminal cases and will focus on topics such as burdens and standards of proof, evidentiary presumptions, and judicial notice. Prerequisite: Evidence. LAW eight hundred and five v01 Advanced Individual Income Tax and Personal Financial Planning LL.M Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours The course will examine selected topics of individual taxation that are often relevant when advising high net-worth individuals. The course will include topics such as the Qualified dealings Income Deduction; itemized deductions; individual net operating losses; interest expense deductions (Mortgage Interest, Investment Interest, and Interest Tracing); loss limitations (Passive Activity Loss, At-Risk, Excess Business Loss); basic income tax considerations in financial planning; and tax exclusion on gain from the sale of a principal residence. The class will also discuss the alternative income-based tax systems applicable to individuals: Individual AMT, Net Investment Income Tax, and Self-Employment Tax. The class will be beneficial for students that seek to advise high net worth individuals (such as executives, entrepreneurs, or closely held business owners) in financial planning, tax, and estate planning matters. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I). LAW two thousand and seventy-three v00 Advanced International Commercial Arbitration LL.M Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This course will provide an indepth study of specific topics in international commercial arbitration from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Topics to be considered will include: the arbitration agreement - the separability doctrine, choice of law, parties to the agreement (including non-signatory issues), competence-competence, enforcement of the agreement and other types of national court intervention; complex arbitrations - multiparty and multicontract issues, joinder of parties, consolidation of cases, parallel proceedings; the arbitral tribunal - selection of arbitrators, duties of arbitrators, independence and impartiality issues, challenges of arbitrators; the arbitral proceedings - bifurcation, interim measures, evidentiary rules, the conduct of hearings; and the arbitral award - drafting of awards, enforcement and setting aside of awards, the one thousand, nine hundred and fifty-eight modern York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Awards. The course will refer to arbitration rules, case law, statutes and international conventions. Prerequisite: International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, or permission of the instructor. Mutually Excluded Courses : This course is mutually exclusive with the other spring course by this same name (LAWG/J 888). Note: Please note, the date for the final class session will be announced at the start of the semester. LAW eight hundred and eighty-eight v00 Advanced International Commercial Arbitration: Practice Seminar LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | three credit hours The seminar will be a combination of the theoretical and practical aspects of international commercial arbitration, with an emphasis on the practical. Its centerpiece will be the handling of a mock international arbitration case from the drafting of the arbitration agreement to the drafting of a final award, with units in between on the appointment and challenge of arbitrators, discovery of documents, and a live arbitration hearing. Teams of students will participate (as counsel to the parties) in the negotiation of arbitration agreements, in the drafting of motions and replies, in oral argument on such issues as the disqualification of arbitrators and the production of documents in discovery, in the hearing in a case, and in brief writing. Playing the role of arbitrators, students will also write final arbitral awards. To the extent time permits, the course will also consider a handful of the many difficult and, to a large extent, still unanswered questions of national and international law that are emerging as the practice of international arbitration expands, including choice of law issues and, particularly in the United States, issues of the relation between federal and state laws. The course will be limited to twelve students. It will meet once a week for two hours. There will be no final exam. Prerequisite: A general course in international commercial arbitration. Students not having this precise prerequisite but having had a course in arbitration generally or substantial law practice experience in arbitration may apply for admission to the course by emailing Professor Joelson at joelsonmr@msn.com. Mutually Excluded Courses: This course is mutually exclusive with the other spring course by this same name (LAWG 2073). Note: This course does not meet the J.D. writing requirement (WR). LAW seven hundred and ten v00 Advanced International Taxation LL.M Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course is designed for those students that wish to gain a deeper understanding of the effect of certain U.S. rules governing the taxation of U.S. persons doing business overseas and foreign persons doing business in the United States. The course will cover a broad range of topics with particular emphasis on the tax consequences of cross-border reorganizations, liquidations and taxable acquisitions and dispositions. The course will cover the tax consequences of outbound transfers of assets, foreign-to-foreign transfers of assets, and inbound transfers of assets. Students will be expected to have a working knowledge of corporate taxation, and transactional aspects of subpart F and the foreign tax credit rules. Prerequisite: Corporate Income Tax Law I (or Corporate Taxation (formerly Taxation II)); International Tax (or U.S. International Outbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Domestic Persons With Activities Outside of the U.S)) Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporate Income Tax Law II (or completion of Corporate Taxation (formerly Taxation II)). LAW four hundred and eighty-three v01 Advanced Issues in International Human Rights Seminar LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course will examine specific issues in international human rights law drawn from the current decisions of international human rights supervisory bodies. The course will be divided into two halves. The first half of the course will consist of lectures and discussions on seven specific issues as illustrated by cases decided by international jurisdictional bodies. For example, we will examine the decisions of the International Court of Justice (Breard, LaGrand) and the Advisory Opinion of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (OC-16) on an alien ’s right to consular assistance, in the context of the creation of international human rights norms and the problems arising from a multiplicity of international jurisdictions. We will examine the two decisions (Section and Grand Chamber) of the European Court of Human Rights on the Refah Partisi case as regards the compatibility of Islam and democracy in the context of the universality of human rights debate. We will examine decisions of the European Commission and Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Commission in an attempt to trace the changing definition of “torture” in the context of the Guantanamo detainees case. The second half of the course will be dedicated to the oral presentation of research papers and discussion of these paper topics. Prerequisite: International Law I (or an equivalent course in Public International Law). Recommended: A survey class in Human Rights Law. judge thirty-six v08 Advanced Legal Writing for International Business Lawyers J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours With the increasing globalization of the practice of law, business lawyers today are frequently representing clients in transactions that span different legal systems, cultures, and languages. This course is designed to provide students with practical insight into the cross-border practice of business law and the relevant written and oral skills necessary to effectively communicate in this practice setting. The principle objectives of the course are to teach you how to communicate clearly, concisely, and appropriately in a business-law setting, and how to apply and adapt these skills to situations involving international, cross-cultural, and even multinational business transactions. You will be able to practice these skills through a variety of written and oral communication exercises based on actual cross-border transactions similar to those you will likely encounter as a junior transactional associate at a law firm. The focus of this course will be on practical skills, rather than on theoretical analysis. Although some of our discussions and exercises will involve reviewing contract provisions and you will become familiar with basic contract structure, this is not a course on contract drafting. Rather, the focus is on developing your practical lawyering skills such that you are able to effectively communicate with parties from all sides of a cross-border business transaction and to recognize and overcome the principle cultural, linguistic, and other barriers to cross-cultural communication. Enrollment by both JD and LL.M. students is encouraged. Class time generally will be split between lecturing and in-class exercises and discussion. The majority of the in-class exercises will utilize fact scenarios from actual deals and will involve students working in small groups or teams. Prerequisite: Legal Practice: Writing and Analysis. Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations is recommended but not required. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and the Advanced Legal Writing Seminar, Advanced Legal Writing and Practice for Judicial Clerks and Civil Litigators, Advanced Legal Writing: Legal Writing as a Discipline, Advanced Legal Writing: Practical Skills from Retail Industry Examples, or Writing for Law Practice. Note: Students may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor through the due date of the final draft of Writing Project # 2. LL.M. STUDENTS : THIS COURSE REQUIRES DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION TO ENROLL . LL.M. students cannot register or put themselves on the waitlist for this course through MyAccess. Students interested in taking this course should send an e-mail to LL.M. STUDENTS : THIS COURSE REQUIRES DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION TO ENROLL . LL.M. students cannot register or put themselves on the waitlist for this course through MyAccess. Students interested in taking this course should send an e-mail to llmas@georgetown.edu indicating their interest in the course and their previous exposure to U.S. legal writing. LAW one thousand, five hundred and thirty-two v00 Advanced Legal Writing for International Business Lawyers J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course is designed to provide students interested in transactional practice with hands-on insight into the cross-border practice of business law by creating a simulated law-firm environment in which students are asked to Complete tasks as if they were junior associates. The principle objectives of the course are to teach students how to communicate clearly, concisely, and appropriately in a business-law setting, and how to apply and adapt these skills to situations involving international, cross-cultural, and even multinational business transactions. Students will practice these skills through a variety of written and oral communication exercises based on actual cross-border transactions similar to those they will likely encounter as a junior transactional associate at a law firm. The focus of this course will be on practical skills, rather than on theoretical analysis. Although some of our discussions and exercises will involve reviewing contract provisions and students will become familiar with basic contract structure, this is not a course on contract drafting. Rather, the focus is on developing the student’s practical lawyering skills such that he or she is able to effectively communicate with parties from all sides of a cross-border business transaction and to recognize and overcome the principle cultural, linguistic, and other barriers to cross-cultural communication. Enrollment by both JD and LL.M. students is encouraged. Class time generally will be split between lecturing and in-class exercises and discussion. The majority of the in-class exercises will utilize fact scenarios from actual deals and will involve students working in small groups or teams. Prerequisite: Legal Practice: Writing and Analysis. Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations is recommended but not required. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and the Advanced Legal Writing Seminar, Advanced Legal Writing and Practice for Judicial Clerks and Civil Litigators, Advanced Legal Writing: Legal Writing as a Discipline, Advanced Legal Writing: Practical Skills from Retail Industry Examples, or Writing for Law Practice. Note: Students may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor through the due date of the final draft of Writing Project # 2. LL.M. STUDENTS : THIS COURSE REQUIRES DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION TO ENROLL . LL.M. students cannot register or put themselves on the waitlist for this course through MyAccess. Students interested in taking this course should send an e-mail to LL.M. STUDENTS : THIS COURSE REQUIRES DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION TO ENROLL . LL.M. students cannot register or put themselves on the waitlist for this course through MyAccess. Students interested in taking this course should send an e-mail to llmas@georgetown.edu indicating their interest in the course and their previous exposure to U.S. legal writing. LAW six hundred and eighty-one v00 Advanced Online Legal Research LL.M Seminar | one credit hour This course will build on the research techniques learned in U.S. Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing. It will focus on resources available online, including Lexis, Westlaw and the Internet. The course will prepare students to conduct U.S. legal research either in a legal setting in the United States, or abroad. There will be ample time for questions from the students , so that specific topics of interest to the class can be covered. Note: The course is graded honors-pass-fail. This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree), and enrollment is limited to a small number of students . ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. all enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. all enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the keyboard of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. LAW 702 v00 Advanced Partnership Taxation LL.M Course | two credit hours Focuses on the skills necessary (including review of transactional documents) for a tax attorney involved in advising on partnership structuring matters. Topics will include drafting the partnership agreement, allocations of tax items, amortization of partnership intangibles, classification/conversions, interplay of partnership rules on debt restructuring application of various gain triggers upon exiting from partnerships, partnership mergers and divisions, partnership equity-based compensation, and the partnership anti-abuse rules. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I); Taxation of Partnerships. Neither prerequisite may be taken concurrently. LAW 943 v00 radical Private means Planning Seminar LL.M Seminar | 4 credit hours This course will provide students with a solid grounding in advanced estate-planning techniques and help them build the drafting and client-relations skills necessary to develop and implement a comprehensive estate plan. This course is required for the Certificate of Study in Estate Planning. The course will be structured in two modules. The first module will introduce students to technical tax regimes (such as the generation-skipping transfer tax) and more complex planning scenarios. Topics covered will include philanthropy and private wealth planning; the role in estate planning of private foundations, public charities, and supporting organizations; charitable giving techniques; planning for family controlled businesses; planning for highly-compensated individuals; and international aspects of private wealth planning . The second module will consist of a hands-on exercise in developing, drafting, and executing a complex estate plan. Working from a comprehensive fact pattern, students will make in-class presentations about the problem and participate in the development of the estate plan by drafting documents and by commenting on drafts prepared by others. These documents may include legal memoranda, client communications, and analysis of planning alternatives, as well as the will, trust instruments, and organizational documents for charitable entities. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I), Decedents’ Estates or equivalent, or Wills & Trusts; Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates; Estate and grant Tax; Special Topics in Transfer Tax. Note: This course is only open to students enrolled in the Taxation LL.M. program, or who have been admitted to the joint JD/Taxation LL.M. program by professor permission. Interested students should contact Ellis Duncan via email at ged5@law.georgetown.edu no later than August 1, two thousand and twenty for permission to take this class. Students require permission from professor to withdraw from this course. LAW two thousand and sixty-two v00 Advanced Scholarly Writing LL.M Seminar | one credit hour The objective of this course is to help you become a better and more confident writer in English. To do this, linguist-lawyer co-teachers guide you through the process of writing a law seminar paper. Our method includes studying former students’ outlines, drafts, and publications to gain insight into seminar paper expectations. all course assignments map onto your seminar paper, including: planning your paper writing process; refining your paper topic; conducting academic research; implementing legal writing strategies; drafting documents via an iterative method; gaining understanding of U.S. legal writing culture; revising, self-editing, and proofreading. Individual written feedback is provided throughout the course to allow you to learn from your own writing. Note: This class is graded on a pass/fail basis. Students must be concurrently taking a two or three credit seminar paper course to enroll in Advanced Scholarly Writing. This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. or J.D. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree). ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. all enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. LAW 381 v02 Advanced Studies in Federal Securities Regulation: Policy and Practice J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This seminar course offers an opportunity for in depth discussion of key issues in securities regulation including current Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and popular Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) regulatory and enforcement actions, how regulatory decisions are made, the economic and other policy bases for SEC and PCAOB regulation, and the operation and impact of the SEC’s regulatory oversight and enforcement programs in the recent financial crisis . Guest speaker participants will include members and senior staff from the SEC and PCAOB and experienced securities practitioners. Grading will be based on a final paper on an approved topic and class participation. Learning goals for this course: Develop a high level understanding of how securities regulations are developed and applied, using a series of studies of specific regulatory issues, with frequent guest speakers from government and private practice. Prerequisite: Corporations; Securities Regulation (may be taken concurrently). Note: This course requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the three credit section of the course if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. judge one thousand, five hundred and thirty-four v00 Advanced Topics in Corporate Law: Control and Its Implications J.D. Course (cross-listed) | one credit hour In a significant minority of public corporations, a single person or entity has the power to choose the directors of the corporation and determine the outcome of stockholder votes. Many private corporations operate with this governance profile. Corporations fitting this profile are described as “ controlled.” In the standard model of the corporation, the power to direct and oversee the business and affairs of the entity rests with the board of directors, who are obligated as fiduciaries to act in the best interests of the company and its stockholders. When a party other than the board of directors has the ability to control the corporation, it upsets the standard model, with knock-on effects for a variety of corporate doctrines. This course examines the nature of control and its implications. In addition to covering these issues in the context of public companies, the course will examine their implications for privately held companies and touch on their application to alternative entities. Course enrollment is limited to 50. Students are expected to possess a basic understanding of the law applicable to alternative entities and corporations. An introductory course in corporations or business associations is a prerequisite. Learning Objectives : After taking this course, students will understand the following topics: What constitutes control? What are the different types of control and what factors contribute to its existence? What fiduciary duties do controllers owe? When and why do they arise? How does the presence of a controller affect corporate doctrines such as the standard of review, demand futility, and ratification? What devices can be used to mitigate the effects of control, such as special committees, majority-of-the-minority votes, and enhanced-independence directors? What are the implications of particular methods of maintaining control, with particularly emphasis on the currently trending device of dual class stock? Prerequisite: Corporations. Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend any class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Add/Drop and Withdrawal Policies No student will be permitted to drop this course after January 21, 2021. Failure to drop the course by January 21, two thousand and twenty-one will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. No student will be permitted to drop this course after January 21, 2021. Failure to drop the course by January 21, two thousand and twenty-one will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. LAW one thousand, five hundred and twenty-one v00 Advanced Topics in Corporate Law: Corporate Transaction Litigation in Delaware J.D. Course (cross-listed) | one credit hour This course will explore corporate litigation in the Court of Chancery in the context of mergers, acquisitions, and other transactional structures. The course is divided into three parts. Part I will begin with a discussion of Delaware’s place in the world of corporate litigation and then turn to the topic of expedited deal litigation. This will include the mechanics of initiating a lawsuit to challenge a deal, together with the Court ’s role in resolving preliminary and logistical issues, before turning to the substantive law governing motions for expedition and motions for preliminary or permanent injunctive relief. Finally, we will discuss the plaintiff ’s role in corporate governance and recent issues in class action settlements. Part II will focus on derivative litigation, in theory and in practice, beginning with the statutory and summary procedures available in the Court of Chancery. We will discuss high profile company catastrophes and the role of derivative litigation in that context. We will then turn to the complex derivative puzzles created by transactions and corporate structures. In Part III, we will discuss the other route to redress in connection with transactions: appraisal. We will review the appraisal statute and questions of standing to understand who can pursue appraisal and how. We will also discuss the rise of appraisal arbitrage and explore the role of the merger price in appraisal. In addition to reading cases, students will be asked to read parts of briefs actually filed in Delaware corporate litigation. Selected students will be assigned to discuss cases or to (informally) argue the briefed issues as assigned. Following in-class argument, we will discuss the outcome of the actual ligation. We anticipate covering one part described above on each of the three class days. Approximately half of the class time will concern issues of common-law litigation of corporate transactions. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the common issues arising in corporate transactional litigation; which actions may be brought directly and which must be pursued derivatively; which are statutory and which arise under the common law; and what current “ hot” corporate litigation issues are currently being litigated in Delaware. Prerequisite: Corporations. Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. all enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend any class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Add/Drop and Withdrawal Policies No student will be permitted to drop this course after January 29, 2021. Failure to drop the course by January 29, two thousand and twenty-one will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. No student will be permitted to drop this course after January 29, 2021. Failure to drop the course by January 29, two thousand and twenty-one will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. LAW one thousand, five hundred and thirty-five v00 Advanced Topics in Corporate Law: Management Misconduct J.D. Course (cross-listed) | one credit hour Through the lens of Delaware law, this course will review the roles of the board of directors, senior officers, and stockholders in overseeing a corporation, monitoring management conduct, and promoting compliance. The course will consider the director’s duty of oversight, its origins, and how it has evolved. The course will examine whether senior officers owe a similar duty of oversight, or whether different duties apply. We will delve deeply into the derivative action, which is the primary enforcement mechanism through which stockholders can address management misconduct. As part of this effort, we will explore the various stages of the derivative action and consider its strengths and weaknesses. As its source materials, the course will examine recent derivative lawsuits. The course also will consider hot-button topics, such as # MeToo issues as a business risk. Course enrollment is limited to 50. Students are expected to possess a basic understanding of the law applicable to alternative entities and corporations. An introductory course in corporations is a prerequisite. Learning Objectives : After taking this course, students will be able to answer the following questions: What standards apply to a board and senior officers when overseeing a corporation, monitoring for misconduct, and promoting compliance ? What is the duty of oversight, how did it arise, and how has it evolved? What is the nature of a stockholder derivative action, the various stages of the proceeding, and its strengths and weaknesses? Are stockholder derivative actions an effective way of policing management misconduct? Is the Delaware corporate model particularly prone to management misconduct? Do alternative structures, such as B-corps or constituency-based models, offer promising alternatives? Can a corporation serve morally good ends? Prerequisite: Corporations. Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend any class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Add/Drop and Withdrawal Policies No student will be permitted to drop this course after October 15, 2020. Failure to drop the course by October 15, two thousand and twenty will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. No student will be permitted to drop this course after October 15, 2020. Failure to drop the course by October 15, two thousand and twenty will result in a withdrawal. No student may withdraw from this class without permission from the professors. LAW one thousand, four hundred and six v00 Advanced Topics in Corporate Law: Unincorporated Business Entities J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | one credit hour So-called “alternative” or “ unincorporated” business entities, most notably limited liability companies (LLCs) and limited partnerships (LPs), indisputably have become an important and apparently permanent fixture in American business. They are becoming the entity form of choice for privately held businesses, but equity interests in LLCs and LPs are also traded publicly on national securities exchanges. From a legal perspective, and similar to traditional corporations, state law subjects the creation, termination, and internal governance of alternative entities to a mix of statutory rules and common law doctrine that address issues of efficient allocation of capital, creditor protection, and agency costs. More so than with corporations, however, the intent of the applicable state law is to facilitate maximal private ordering and customization appropriate to the unique needs and characteristics of any individual company. This flexibility provides obvious benefits to business planners. At the same time, however, it engenders a fundamental legal challenge: how to balance that flexibility with the development of guiding precedents and predictability otherwise characteristic of the corporate and common law traditions? This course introduces students to that very challenge. Topics covered include alternative entity formation and dissolution; the centrality of operating agreements and freedom of contract in establishing the rights and responsibilities of stakeholders ; the fiduciary and contractual duties of managers, contractual modification or elimination of fiduciary duties, and the relationship between “ contractual fiduciary duties” and the implied contractual covenant of good faith and fair dealing; and judicial review of self-interested transactions, especially in the increasingly litigious environment of public M&A. Students are expected to possess a basic understanding of the law applicable to alternative entities and corporations. Prerequisite: Corporations. Note: This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the seven credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory and all enrolled students must attend the first class in order to remain enrolled. Students on the wait list must attend the first class in order to be admitted off the wait list. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar. once the second class session begins, students may only seek a withdrawal by contacting an academic advisor in the Office of JD Academic Services. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory and all enrolled students must attend the first class in order to remain enrolled. Students on the wait list must attend the first class in order to be admitted off the wait list. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar. Once the second class session begins, students may only seek a withdrawal by contacting an academic advisor in the Office of JD Academic Services. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. LAW two thousand and ninety-four v00 Advanced Topics in International Humanitarian Law LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | three credit hours This seminar is intended to provide students with an interest in international humanitarian law (IHL) with an opportunity to undertake indepth research, and write a substantial paper, on key issues in IHL. Potential topics include thresholds for the application of IHL, the interface of IHL with human rights law and domestic law, the protection of civilians and non-combatants from the effects of conflict, the application of IHL protections to unprivileged belligerents, the standards for detention under IHL, including both permissible duration and treatment, emerging trends regulating the use of lethal force as a first resort under IHL, arms control and IHL (landmines, cluster munitions, autonomous weapons), the application of IHL to cyber “ warfare”, U.S. interpretation of customary and treaty IHL, the efficacy of IHL in current conflicts in the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and other topics. Building upon a foundation of assigned readings on core IHL topics, the professors and students will tailor classroom work to coincide with the students ’ research projects. Students will be expected to participate actively in class and to share their own research during the semester with other students. Learning objectives: Through a structured process, to develop a scholarly paper on international humanitarian law, we aim to give the student, working closely with the professor, an opportunity to explore his or her topic in depth and to write a paper worthy of publication in a law journal. Strongly Recommended: Courses in public international law, human rights law or international humanitarian law (the law of armed conflict). LAW one thousand, six hundred and two v00 Advanced Topics in Torts: Products Liability, Guns, and Drugs J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This upper level course will cover the law of products liability generally and take a close look at the state of products liability litigation and liability in relation to guns and to opioids. The goal is to combine a survey of the complicated field of products liability law with a sophisticated deep dive into two areas of cutting edge products liability litigation. The first part of the course will familiarize students with major topics applicable to all products manufacturers including: a product distributor’s liability for defect-caused harm, allocating responsibility inside and outside the commercial chain of distribution, causation, affirmative defenses, approaches to design defect litigation, and federal preemption of products liability claims. ulterior in the course, we will examine gun manufacturer liability, currently and prior to the passage of the Protection of Lawful Protection in Arms Act, which reshaped the landscape of gun litigation. Finally, we will end with a consideration of the growing litigation related to the opioids, litigation inflected by doctrines peculiar to prescription drug manufacturer liability. The final examination will be a self-scheduled forty-eight hour take home exam. Attendance and participation are crucial to the course, and significant credit will be given to those students who contribute thoughtfully and constructively to class discussion of cases and issues. LAW three thousand and eighteen v00 Advocacy in International Arbitration LL.M Course | two credit hours Students in this small seminar will receive individualized instruction in oral and written advocacy in advanced topics in international arbitration. The scope of instruction will include both procedural and substantive topics. The principle underlying the course is that students will learn by doing. Enrollment will be based only on professor permission; students should not rank this course in the pre-registration process. Permission will be principally based on the results of a moot court try-out competition. Recommended: Prior enrollment in an introductory course in international arbitration Note: Note: This course is only open to LL.M. students. Students must seek professor permission to enroll. LAW eight hundred and eighty-five v00 Advocacy in International Arbitration LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course blends mock litigation experiences with class discussion of techniques, strategy, and ethics in international arbitration proceedings. Students directly participate in a series of practice problems based upon proceedings brought by a foreign investor against a State before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), including role-playing as litigators and arbitrators. This course emphasizes advocacy in connection with jurisdictional disputes, selecting and challenging arbitrators, limits on the enforceability of awards, and other litigation problems that arise in the globalized environment of international investment and arbitration. There will be a number of oral advocacy assignments throughout the semester. The course grade will be a function of those assignments and class participation. Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law Note: Students participate in in-class exercises and are graded on those exercises and productive class participation. LAW one hundred and twenty-seven v00 Advocacy Tools for Public Interest Lawyers J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course is designed for students embarking on careers in public interest law or policy and explores the many necessary techniques to become highly effective advocates for social change. The purpose of the class is to help class participants develop creative advocacy approaches and learn to think beyond litigation and other traditional legal strategies to meet key client and societal goals. In particular, the course will: 1) explore how coalition building, grassroots organizing, and public policy advocacy can be used to enhance legal strategies ; 2) teach basic public interest advocacy skills, including media relations, fundraising basics, legislative advocacy and lobbying, leveraging data and research, social marketing and public opinion, and cutting-edge digital strategies; and 3) introduce students to dynamic experts in relevant issue areas, from lobbyists to communications experts. Using compelling case studies and background reading materials, students will have the opportunity to use multiple advocacy tools to tackle real-life social problems on the local and national levels. Grades will be based on the extent and quality of class participation and written assignments. Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. LAW one thousand, six hundred and thirty-two v00 Aggregate Litigation: A Global Perspective J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | one credit hour In a world of mass production, mass harm often follows. A defective product might injure numerous consumers; a false report might mislead multiple investors; and a discriminative practice might impact a large number of employees. In such cases, litigation by each individual plaintiff might prove ineffective, and often impractical. To resolve this problem, legal systems have devised various forms of aggregate litigation and collective redress procedures. This introductory course discusses the key characteristics of these procedures, using a comparative framework. Class actions and alternative collective redress regimes in the U.S., Canada, Australia, Israel and Europe will be studied, and the potential for multi-national aggregate litigation, in a single or in multiple forums, will be explored. Note: This course will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:10 a.m. - 1:10 p.m. on the following dates: 9/5, 9/10, 9/12, 9/17, 9/19, 9/24, and 9/26. LAW three hundred and sixty-nine v01 AIDS Law and Ethics Seminar J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This course examines the social, legal, political, and ethical controversies surrounding the HIV/AIDS pandemic in contemporary society. It covers both domestic and international law and policy. The course is divided into several parts. scrap I covers the role of social movements and mobilization in the response to HIV/AIDS. Part II, AIDS in the Courtroom, covers the major court cases related to HIV/AIDS in the United States and in key countries around the world like South Africa, India and Brazil that provide important comparative perspectives to understand the power of law. These cases demonstrate the social impact of AIDS– the effect of litigation on social institutions, constitutional law, and interpersonal relationships. Part III, Rights and Dignity, examines the role of international human rights, privacy, and discrimination. Part IV, Policy, Politics, and Ethics, covers a wide range of the most contentious debates of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, including testing, named reporting, civil and criminal confinement, sex work, drug law and policy, LGBT rights, and gender. The final Part, Governance and Financing, examines the absence of political leadership, the international trade system which militates against access to affordable treatment in low- and middle-income countries, the systems of financing for HIV in the U.S. and around the world, and the ethics of international collaborative research. The AIDS pandemic has reached deeply into all major spheres of modern life–e.g., law, medicine, economics, and politics. The pandemic has transformed society and restructured ethical values. This course provides an account of the major themes of the pandemic during the last three decades and offers an analysis of contemporary and future policy. Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this seminar and the course, AIDS Law and Ethics. Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3-credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2-credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. LAW sixty-five v02 Alternative, Complementary, and Integrative Medicine, The Legal Issues Seminar J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | three credit hours Alternative, Complementary, and Integrative Medicine (non-traditional medicine) (CAM) is the fastest-growing sector of American Health supervision and is one of the fastest growing fields in the United States. Presently, at least fifty percent of Americans are using some form of alternative and complementary therapy such as acupuncture, nutritional supplementation, herbs, massage, yoga, chiropractic and homeopathy. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1997, visits to alternative health care practitioners exceeded total visits to all conventional primary care physicians. The number of clinics and hospitals that integrate some modalities of CAM alongside conventional medicine is growing rapidly. The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, has held recent conferences on the values of both CAM and Integrative Medicine. The NIH is using significant resources to fund research in this area. This development, of course, is raising legal issues. There is a growing but still unsettled body of law on this subject. Some but not all CAM modalities are now licensed and regulated by at least some states. Federal regulatory bodies, such as the FDA and FTC are trying, within the limits of their statutory authority, to protect what they perceive to be the interests of the public. Yet, they come at the problem through conventional, rather than alternative, eyes. Conventional law is based upon protecting the public from purveyors of the proverbial snake oil frauds. And to an extent this law is being used to keep out alternatives to the established health-care modalities. This seminar studies the tensions, legal, economic, and social, of this struggle as it unfolds. This seminar covers several areas of law including administrative law, medical malpractice, informed consent, FDA/FTC law, among others. A paper meeting the upperclass legal writing requirement is required. LAW two thousand and ninety v00 American Legal Discourse LL.M Seminar | one credit hour Introduces students to U.S. legal resources, research methods, and analytical paradigms. graphology assignments give students the opportunity to develop written analysis using the approaches, forms, and conventions common in U.S. law. Note: This Class is Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. LAW one thousand, one hundred and seven v00 Analytical Methods J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours Lawyers in every type of practice (corporate, litigation, government, public interest, etc.) routinely deal with problems that require a basic understanding of concepts and methods from economics and statistics. This course provides an introduction to these subjects and their application and relevance to law and legal practice. Topics covered include decision analysis, game theory, probability theory, and statistics. Grades will be based on class participation, a graded problem set, and a final examination. No prior background in economics or statistics is required; however, we will regularly use elementary algebra and geometry. Students with strong backgrounds in economics, mathematics, or statistics should consult with the professor before enrolling in the course. LAW three thousand and twenty-five v00 Anthropology, Global Health, and the Law LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | one credit hour Globalization has inevitably forced lawyers, public health professionals, health care professionals, and anthropologists alike to rethink the traditional approaches and methods relied upon within their disciplines. As international borders continue to disappear and countries and people throughout the world become increasingly interconnected and interdependent, public health threats can easily become global in scale and can only be properly addressed through multidisciplinary efforts at global, national, and local levels. Time and time again, the implementation of sound public health measures has proven difficult in communities when local culture and ideology are not considered or properly understood. As governments and international organizations increasingly rely on the law as a fundamental tool for solving critical health problems, it is of the utmost importance that the laws and regulations that they adopt with the aim of protecting and advancing population health, as well as their implementation, properly reflect the social and cultural context of those affected. Through the analysis of case studies from various areas of global health (including non-communicable diseases, infectious diseases, climate change and health, and gender and health), this course aims to underscore the importance both of incorporating anthropological methods into the practice of global health law and of utilizing a multidisciplinary approach when addressing global health challenges. Recommended: Prior enrollment in Global Health Law and any coursework in public health, public health law, and cultural anthropology. Note: This class will meet on the following Summer two thousand and seventeen Wednesdays: 6/21, 6/28, 7/5, 7/12, and 7/19. LAW thirty-eight v02 Antitrust Economics and Law J.D. Course (cross-listed) | four credit hours This course covers the major federal legislation and doctrine in the field of antitrust law with a primary focus upon governmental efforts to promote competition. Emphasis is placed upon the growing role of economic analysis and trends in judicial interpretation relating to the coordination, monopolies, mergers and joint ventures, as well as evolving legal standards, including the role of decision theory in setting legal standards. This version of basic antitrust places greater emphasis on the tools of economic analysis that have taken on growing importance in antitrust as well as controversies between Chicago School and post-Chicago economic approaches. There is no economics prerequisite. The necessary economic tools will be developed in the course. Students should be prepared to master economic as well as legal materials. There will be written assignments that must be submitted for each class. Attendance is also required. Recommended: Some economics background is helpful, but not required. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this course and Antitrust Law. Note: Laptops may not be used during class sessions. LAW thirty-eight v01 Antitrust Law J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This course covers the major federal legislation in the field of antitrust law, with a primary focus upon governmental efforts to promote competition, including Sections one and two of the Sherman Act, and Section seven of the Clayton Act. Emphasis is placed upon the growing role of economic analysis and other modern trends in judicial interpretation, with an emphasis on understanding the means by which courts determine whether unilateral and collaborative business conduct is pro-competitive or anticompetitive, regardless of the particular statutory provision at issue. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this course and Antitrust Economics and Law. LAW thirty-eight v50 Antitrust judge J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This course covers the major federal antitrust statutes and related federal agency guidelines, with a primary focus on government efforts to protect and promote competition through the Sherman Act, the Clayton Act, and Section five of the Federal Trade Commission Act. Emphasis is placed on the growing use of economic analysis and other modern trends in judicial interpretation of these statutes, and on recent case law addressing vertical and horizontal restraints, monopolization, and mergers. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for both this course and Antitrust Economics and Law. LAW one thousand, three hundred and ninety-six v00 Antitrust Law Seminar: Case Development and Litigation Strategy J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This course explores the process of raising and defending against antitrust challenges. Through a series of contemporary case studies, we will examine the resolution of antitrust disputes, focusing on the substantive strategies and procedural tools available to the litigants . In the context of these case studies, we will discuss criminal indictments, plea agreements and the DOJs leniency policy, sufficiency of pleading, presumptions and burdens of proof, rules of evidence (including the use of expert evidence), dispositive pretrial motions, class actions and class action settlement strategies, temporary restraining orders and preliminary injunctions, treble damage judgments, interlocutory and final appeals, and Supreme Court review. There will be no exam, but a paper will be required. Prerequisite: Antitrust Law or Antitrust Economics and Law. Note: This seminar requires a paper. Students must register for the three credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. LAW three thousand and fifty-one v00 Arbitration in Latin America LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | two credit hours Commercial and investment arbitration have gained increasing importance in Latin America. The last decade has seen, on the one hand, substantial amendments in the arbitration laws of the region and, on the other, an increase in the claims by investors under bilateral investment treaties and free trade agreements. But is there a Latin American arbitration? Is there a common approach to arbitration by the different countries in the region? Have the countries in the region simply adopted international standards and rules, or is there a Latin American contribution to the development of arbitration? Is there a Latin American way of conducting arbitration or rather an increasing adoption of practices and rules more akin to common law traditions? How can lawyers trained in the common-law tradition work in arbitrations subject to the laws of Latin American countries and located in Latin American venues? What have been the effects of the so-called “constitutionalization” of arbitration? Is there a uniform approach of Latin American countries to arbitration under investment treaties? Is there a trend to expand the relevance of local law in investment claims and to insist in the Calvo doctrine? Do human rights or rights of indigenous communities play a role in investment disputes? Where is the debate as to whether the existing investment treaties and the arbitration rules reflect the dominant interests of capital-exporting nations? What have been the defense strategies of Latin American states? The mere definition of what is Latin America presents a challenge to both lawyers and historicists. This course will explore, with a brief introduction as to the historical differences and common grounds between the countries in the region, the responses to the different questions that arise in a region where the approach to arbitration swings from the magic solution to reduce work overload in courts to a public enemy that should be eliminated. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory international arbitration course. Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS . Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar ; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. LAW one thousand, three hundred and twenty-nine v00 Art Law Seminar: Images, Objects, and Culture J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This course will examine major intersections of law and art in the United States, focusing on cases and legislation in light of social, political, and art historical influences. We will consider questions implicated by art law’s myriad incarnations, such as why art receives special legal treatment, how law defines art, and who benefits. Ongoing themes will be the dissonances of existing law with twenty-first century culture and digital technology, and new developments. Areas include freedom of expression, copyright, moral rights, authenticity, the right of publicity, authorship, museums, and the art market, with visits by outside speakers on selected topics. all students taking the course will be expected to develop original papers reflecting substantial critical engagement with an art law topic of their choice, in satisfaction of the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for J.D. students. Participation will also play a significant role in the course, including discussion of assigned readings and short reflection pieces. Classroom time in the latter part of the semester will be devoted to student presentations and feedback. Learning goals for the course: Developing skills in critical analysis and scholarly writing; developing proficiency in a body of law and relevant policy concerns; expanding knowledge of doctrinal analysis through close reading of cases, legislation, and related authorities, along with the influences of cultural and historical context. Recommended: Prior course work in copyright law. Note: THIS COURSE REQUIRES PROFESSOR PERMISSION TO ENROLL . Please submit a brief statement of interest in the seminar by 5:00 pm on Monday, June 4, 2018, to Professor Bonneau (sonya.bonneau@georgetown.edu). Art-related background is not required but may be included in the statement. Professor Bonneau is making her decisions and filling the open slots in the seminar on a rolling basis. LAW one thousand, six hundred and twenty-eight v00 Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, and the Law: A dependent Analysis mid the EU and the U.S. J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | one credit hour The increasing role of technology in humanity raises constant major challenges to law in a variety of moral, theoretical and doctrinal dimensions. The purpose of this course is to analyze current developments in the fields of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and robotics through the prism of legal regulation and/or vice versa (analyzing legal regulation through the prism of AI and robotics). Along with discussing the interface of law and technology through a variety of critical theoretical perspectives, the course will focus on specific topics and case studies as “laboratories” for assessing contemporary approaches to law & technology. The topics to be discussed include a new generation of AI crimes, risk regulation in the fields of autonomous vehicles and data protection, up to the current debate on the legal personhood of robots and AI systems. The main objective of this course is to make students aware of the connections between technology and the legal environment and keep them up-to-date with the current discussions worldwide. It is a unique opportunity to further develop technical knowledge on state-of-the-art topics, such as machine learning, neural networks, and black boxes. The course is worth one credit. Students will write a paper of 2,500-3,000 words, excluding footnotes. This final paper will consist of a case study along the lines of the main topics discussed and analyzed during the course. Note: WEEK ONE COURSE . This seminar will meet for one week only, on the following days: Monday, January 7, 2019, through Friday, January 11, 2019, 9:00 a.m. - 11:35 a.m. This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the seven credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory and all enrolled students must attend the first class in order to remain enrolled. Students on the wait list must attend the first class in order to be admitted off the wait list. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar. once the second class session begins, students may only seek a withdrawal by contacting an academic advisor in the Office of JD Academic Services. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory and all enrolled students must attend the first class in order to remain enrolled. Students on the wait list must attend the first class in order to be admitted off the wait list. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar. Once the second class session begins, students may only seek a withdrawal by contacting an academic advisor in the Office of JD Academic Services. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. LAW thirty v00 Asian Law and Policy Studies Seminar J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | three credit hours This is a research seminar in which students will present their current research on Asian law and policy at the end of seminar classes where we consider the various areas of law and development which have led to the economic dynamism of the Asia-Pacific region. The impact of the Asia-Pacific region on the world market and global economic activity is substantial and continues to grow. In addition, the conspicuous success and some spectacular failures of Asian nations in legal and economic development have prompted suggestions that the experience of these nations may provide models (both positive and negative) for other developing countries and regions. The seminar will explore--in connection with the role of law and legal institutions--the interaction of social change, economic growth, and legal development in East and Southeast Asia. Specific topics will depend on the research interests of the participants, but will include capital formation, financial regulation, transnational trade and investment, intellectual property, land reform, environmental protection, worker protection, human rights, and similar private and public law issues. The first few classes will introduce elements of development economics relevant to law and development. Each student will also prepare a substantial academic work of publishable quality and present a 20-30 minute precis of it to the seminar. The student papers are expected to meet or preferably to exceed the requirements of the typical research paper in scope, depth, and quality. Guest speakers may present some classes separately or together with the instructor. Recommended: Comparative Law (or the equivalent Comparative Law: Legal Systems in Transition) or any course in Asian law. bar two thousand and twenty-eight v01 Assisted Reproductive Technologies and the Law LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours This two or three credit seminar will provide an overview of the underlying and competing laws and policies arising from the assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) that continually make front page news. Since the one thousand, nine hundred and eighty opening of the country ’s 1st IVF clinic amidst protests and pickets, courts and legislatures have struggled to create laws and policies in response to continually evolving reproductive advances. Topics will include: the legal status of the IVF embryo in the context of procreative rights; embryo cryopreservation, storage, disposition and mix-ups; legal implications of advances in egg freezing, reproductive genetics and oncofertility; posthumous reproduction; egg and sperm donation; traditional/genetic and gestational surrogacy; unique issues for single and same-sex couples, including the rapidly changing impact of same-sex marriage; and professional standards, economic and regulatory aspects of the ARTs. novel this semester will be the inclusion of two classes that will examine selected legal and policy aspects of comparative ART law perspectives on “ third-party ART” and the impact these differences have on cross-border reproductive practices, with a particular focus on surrogacy. National experts in their respective fields will provide guest lectures on: medical advances in ART (including a field trip to a locally based national IVF clinic); psychosocial aspects of donor egg and 3rd party ART ; reproductive genetics; and regulation and public relations for ART providers. Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the three credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students. LAW fifty v00 Aviation Law J.D. Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours This course encompasses most aspects of air transportation, including airport and air traffic control liability, air carrier liability in the carriage of passengers and cargo domestically as well as internationally under the Montreal Convention and economic and safety regulation of domestic and international air transportation. The course also includes contributions by practitioners in the field. LAW fifty v01 Aviation judge J.D. Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours The course, taught by practitioners in the field, covers contemporary and cutting-edge aviation topics such as international commercial aviation, aviation security, and the integration of unmanned aircraft systems (i.e., drones) into the national airspace. The course material will encompass most aspects of aviation law, including the law of international civil aviation, the economic and safety regulation of air transportation, aircraft registration and certification, aircraft accidents, airport law, government immunity from tort liability, and airline liability for the carriage of passengers and cargo domestically and internationally under the Montreal Convention. Students are exposed to a range of materials, including cases, treaties, executive agreements, and regulations, with a view towards imparting practical skills that can be applied to any field of law. LAW fifty-four v01 Bankruptcy and Creditors Rights J.D. Course (cross-listed) | three credit hours This course is a general introduction to bankruptcy law. The course begins with a brief analysis of various state laws that relate to or are directly incorporated into the bankruptcy law. Judicial and statutory liens, execution, garnishment, debtors exemptions, and fraudulent conveyances are reviewed. The course then moves to a consideration of the Bankruptcy Code. Topics include: initiation of bankruptcy proceedings; the automatic stay; property of the bankruptcy estate; the trustees avoiding powers, including preferential transfers and fraudulent conveyances; secured, priority, and unsecured creditors rights; debtors exemption rights; the discharge of debt; liquidation under Chapter 7; and rehabilitation plans under Chapters eleven and 13. Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in one of the following courses: Commercial Law: Secured Transactions; Commercial Law: Secured Transactions and Payment Systems. Mutually Excluded Courses : Students may not receive credit for this course and Bankruptcy or Financial Restructuring and Bankruptcy. LAW two thousand and eighty-six v00 Basic Accounting for Lawyers LL.M Course (cross-listed) | two credit hours This is a basic course for students with NO accounting background or experience. A student will learn what an asset and a liability are, what the basic financial statements are, how financial statements are developed from the underlying accounting information of a company, and how the basic transactions of a business affect each line item of each financial statement. Students will learn how to understand the basics as it r
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